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The Art of Alien: Isolation Book Review

A stunning look behind the scenes at a modern horror masterpiece

Alien: Isolation, developer The Creative Assembly’s recent foray into the terrifying realm of director Ridley Scott’s venerated sci-fi horror franchise has been quite the palette cleanser. Amanda Ripley’s claustrophobic game of cat-and-mouse (read our review here)  with the murderous Xenomorph has all but made us completely forget about the colossal failure of last year’s Aliens: Colonial Marines, offering a tense and exhilarating descent into the world of true survival horror.

Review: The Art of Alien: Isolation

Now, publisher Titan Books and  has released a suitably eerie art book to commemorate the release of the game. Featuring a wealth of commentary on the creation of the game from Andy McVittie (the man behind the superb Art of Watch Dogs, also from Titan Books), The Art of Alien: Isolation offers a detailed look into the chilling corridors of the dilapidated Sevastopal space station and the bloodied sights that lurk in the darkness.

Clocking in at a staggering 176 glossy pages, the hardbound Art of Alien: Isolation is filled to the brim with slick character art, concept renderings of weapons and vehicles, ominous sketches and incredibly detailed re-creations from iconic scenes from the classic film. And, lets not forget the star of the show, the Xenomorph itself, which is shown in haunting detail that is sure to both fuel your nightmares for weeks to come, and make fans of artist H.R. Giger’s extraterrestrial killing machine smile from ear to ear. This hefty tome is the perfect companion for fans of the films as well as those just looking for a good read to pull them into the world and lore of Alien: Isolation. Each chapter is chock full of information, including commentary from the artists themselves, offering an unparalleled look the work that went into making the game as authentic to its source material as possible. The book even features a slew of storyboard sequences cut from the game, providing readers with an even deeper look behind the scenes at what went into creating The Creative Assembly’s nightmarish new epic. 

Review: The Art of Alien: Isolation

In terms of production, The Art of Alien: Isolation is just as stunning as you’d expect. The hardbound book, which is laid out in a landscape configuration, features large, glossy pages and rich colors that look simply fantastic. Titan Books’ releases are known for their stellar attention to quality, and The Art of Alien: Isolation is no exception.

If you’re a fan of Alien and are looking for a fine addition to add to your bookshelf, The Art of Alien: Isolation is highly recommended. The art tucked between the covers of this voluminous read is a menagerie of nightmarish scenes and haunting images from the heart of the Sevastopal that are simply stunning. While the quality of the art alone is enough to warrant the purchase of this book, the in-depth commentary and chance to glimpse behind the creative curtain of this modern survival horror classic make this title an essential read.

 

 The Art of Alien: Isolation; Publisher: Titan Books; Author: Andy McVittie; Released: Oct. 7, 2014; MSRP: $34.95

Note: This Review is based on a review copy of the book provided by the publisher, Titan Books.

Frank has been the caffeine-fueled evil overlord of HeyPoorPlayer since 2008. He speaks loudly and carries a big stick to keep the staff of the HPP madhouse in check. A collector of all things that blip and beep, he has an extensive collection of retro consoles and arcade machines crammed into his house. Before founding the site, Frank was a staff writer for the blogs Gaming Judgement and NuclearGeek.
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