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Famicom Mini Hides Secret Message for Modders

Nintendo has a special message for those tinkering with the Famicom Mini

Famicom Mini

Hackers from around the world have recently taken to modding the NES Classic Edition and its Japanese counterpart, the Famicom Mini, in order to customize the system and expand its standard 30-game library by quite a bit, and have made quite a bit of progress so far in doing so. While modding isn’t always something to boast about, NES Classic modders have been pretty vocal about it – and Nintendo knew that it would happen.

While looking through the Famicom Mini’s source code, Japanese modder Bakueizoko came across a peculiar message, seemingly aimed those attempting to mod the system:

“This is the hanafuda captain speaking. Launching emulation in 3…2…1. Many efforts, tears, and countless hours have been put into this jewel. So, please keep this place tidied up and don’t break everything! Cheers, the hanafuda captain.”

Nintendo Hanafuda Cards

We can take away two things from this message, the first being the reference to the “hanafuda captain”. While Nintendo may be big contender in the video game industry now, it wasn’t always that way – in fact, they didn’t start out in the video game business at all. Nintendo first began all the way back in 1899 (yes, 1899) as a card game manufacturer, with a particular emphasis on the hanafuda card game (which is still played around the world today!). While this doesn’t necessarily mean anything, it’s neat that Nintendo is still keeping their past alive – albeit in a very obscure way.

Secondly, this message apparently means that Nintendo was well aware that people would eventually begin attempting to mod the Famicom Mini. What’s even more surprising is the fact that they don’t actually seem to be upset, they merely ask of modders that they respect the work that Nintendo put into making their product. So far the secret message has only been found in the Famicom Mini, but you can bet that if there’s one in the NES Classic Edition then hackers will find it eventually.

Famicom Mini 2

While the NES Classic originally receieved backlash due to a huge product shortage among retailers, modding certainly makes picking one up look more enticing. Does the modding community’s success make you want to get an NES Classic Edition or Famicom Mini or your own? Or, for those who already have one, will you be attempting to modify your system? Let us know in the comments below!

Starting out with nothing more than a Game Boy and a copy of Donkey Kong Land, Kenny has happily been gaming for almost his entire life. Easily-excitable and a bit on the chatty side,Kenny has always been eager to share gaming-related thoughts, opinions, and news with others and has been doing so on Hey Poor Player since 2014 and has previously worked with both PKMNcast and SCATcast. Although his taste in gaming spreads across a wide number of companies and consoles, Kenny holds a particular fondness for Nintendo handheld consoles. He is also very proud of his amiibo collection. You can also find him on Twitter @SuperBayleef talking about video games and general nonsense. Some of his favorite games include Tetris Attack, Pokémon Black Version 2, The World Ends With You, Kingdom Hearts: Dream Drop Distance, Yo-kai Watch, Donkey Kong Country 2, Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS, Kirby's Dreamland 3, Mega Man X, and Castlevania: Order of Ecclesia (among many others).

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